Tooth Extractions

Tooth extraction involves having one or more teeth completely removed from your mouth. A tooth can be removed for the following common reasons.

  • Severe gum disease (periodontal disease) - when bacteria build up on your teeth and damage the bone that holds them in place, the teeth may become loose
  • Tooth decay - if a tooth is very rotten, its nerves and blood vessels can die, leading to a painful abscess
  • Broken tooth that can't be repaired
  • Crowded teeth - if you have a small jaw or lost your milk (baby) teeth early, your teeth may be crooked and you may need to have one or more removed so that the rest can be straightened
  • Wisdom tooth problems - if there isn't enough space in your mouth for your wisdom teeth they may become impacted (stuck behind the tooth in front) and need to be removed

If you don't want to have your tooth taken out, sometimes alternative treatments are available.

Painkillers or antibiotics may ease any pain and swelling, but these will just relieve your symptoms in the short term and won't get rid of the underlying problem.

If an infected tooth is identified early enough, you may be able to have root canal treatment instead of having the whole tooth removed.